Budapest: Our own wanderings, on foot and by bike

By now I’m sure you’ve figured out that some of our best adventures (not most lively, mind you, just memorable and fun) are had when we just wander when and where we want, and see what we come across. There are always a few photos in each city of random churches, memorials, and fun things we do along the way. This entire post is devoted to those adventures! (And, since it can be tough to sort out what everything is after the fact, only some of these churches and memorials are labelled — if you know what something is, and I’ve clearly forgotten, please leave me a comment below!)

Off we go!

Off we go!

While this building is now a hotel, I was struck by the detail on the exterior -- the faces, the figures, and even the birds on top of each tower!

While this building is now a hotel, I was struck by the detail on the exterior — the faces, the figures, and even the birds on top of each tower!

Short-cut through a mostly closed market...

Short-cut through a mostly closed market…

Exteriors

Parisi Udvar is a shopping arcade that occupies the first 2 floors of Brudern House.  I again, was struck by the ornate exterior, especially the "people" leaning out of the building.

Parisi Udvar is a shopping arcade that occupies the first 2 floors of Brudern House. I again, was struck by the ornate exterior, especially the “people” leaning out of the building.

Here is your closer look :)

Here’s your closer look :)

St. Anne's Church, which apparently, is considered one of the most beautiful churches in Budapest.  We went in, to check out if this was true...

St. Anne’s Church, which apparently, is considered one of the most beautiful churches in Budapest. We went in, to check out if this was true…

Yep, I'd say so!

Yep, I’d say so!

Here's more detail -- super ornate!

Here’s more detail — super ornate!

So… in an earlier post we referenced we might check out the communist walking tour as well. Well, we showed up for it, and I guess the guy who was leading it was training, and although he was a very knowledgeable historian, his delivery… well… It’s the only walking tour we started and then ducked out of early. In fact, this is the most memorable part of the walking tour:

Dancing characters!

Dancing characters!

And more dancing characters!

And more dancing characters!

Yes, it’s true… these buffoons performing on the other side of the square caught our attention instead of our poor paid-on-commission tour guide…

So we decided to wander a little more instead, and ended up renting bikes!

Bike rental in Budapest

It turned out to be a fun idea, because we made it further afield than we would have by walking.

The Heroes Monument

The Heroes Monument

Thanks to a quick Google search, I am reminded that these 7 horsemen at the bottom of the columnade are the 7 chieftains responsible for conquering the area now known as Hungary.

Thanks to a quick Google search, I am reminded that these 7 horsemen at the bottom of the columnade are the 7 chieftains responsible for conquering the area now known as Hungary.

Some of the important figures in Hungary's history

Some of the important figures in Hungary’s history

And across the street, the Palace of Art

And across the street, the Palace of Art

After admiring, admittedly from a distance, these magnificent pieces of art, we headed towards the Varosliget City Park, where there are a bunch of interesting things to see:

The pond and Vajdahunyad Castle, which apparently initially was build out of wood and cardboard for the 1896 millennium celebrations.  Since it was such a hit, in 1904 the city rebuilt it out of brick and stone.  The Vajdahunyad Castle complex is a tribute to 21 of the different historical architectural styles found in Hungary, as we discovered as we wandered around...

The pond and Vajdahunyad Castle, which apparently initially was build out of wood and cardboard for the 1896 millennium celebrations. Since it was such a hit, in 1904 the city rebuilt it out of brick and stone. The Vajdahunyad Castle complex is a tribute to 21 of the different historical architectural styles found in Hungary, as we discovered as we wandered around…

The Gothic entrance gate of Vajdahunyad Castle

The Gothic entrance gate of Vajdahunyad Castle

The Romanesque Jak Chapel in the Vajdahunyad Castle complex

The Romanesque Jak Chapel in the Vajdahunyad Castle complex

And, in the Baroque style, the Museum of Hungarian Agriculture, which we also just admired from outside.

And, in the Baroque style, the Museum of Hungarian Agriculture, which we also just admired from outside.

By this time we were starting to think of enjoying the Hungarian baths… We didn’t get any photos of those, either of the Széchenyi Baths — which are in the Varosliget City Park, and are apparently one of the largest, and the hottest thermal baths in Europe — even though we definitely biked as close as we could get to take a look, or the bath we actually bathed at (which name I can’t remember, though I do recall leaving nice and relaxed!). As we had waited until the end of the day, we figured we’d choose a less expensive bath if we were only going to stay a little while.

What we did get photos of, however, is one of Earl’s favourite/most memorable moments of our entire trip:

Yes, these are flavours for cotton candy...

Yes, these are flavours for cotton candy…

And yes, this is the largest cotton candy that Earl has ever eaten!

And yes, this is the largest cotton candy that Earl has ever eaten!

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